Sharing Images
By Miguel Guhlin
Listen to this podcast

Like social bookmarking, sharing images on the web for more than just personal use has become a phenomenon. Sharing pictures so that others can use them — sometimes under Creative Commons copyright — is fast-becoming a way of building a communal image repository. Like Del.icio.us, Flickr was one of the first tools on the scene. Others — such as Zoto, Glide Digital, Shutterbook — are available, but Flickr is by far the best and most widely used. You can even take pictures with your mobile phone and have them automatically appear on Flickr. Some are creatively using Flickr images to generate slide shows.


At their best, these online tools allow you to create web-based photo albums that facilitate image sharing with family and friends, as well as complete strangers if you so choose. You can add comments to the photos, as well as post photos to your blog. This makes these image sharing tools incredibly powerful enablers for you to share your life with others. Unfortunately, they are tools that are used by both adults and children alike and sometimes, images shared can be inappropriate. In other circumstances, they can also be the perfect tool. How these image sharing resources are used and how accessible they are behind district firewalls is up for debate.